Easy Lemon Orzo Faux Risotto is less fussy than the traditional version #recipe on foodiecrush.com

Say it ain’t faux! Yes it is! Faux ri-soh-tto to be exact.

I’m a big believer in real stuff. Real butter. Check. Real friends. They’re the only kind. Real flowers instead of fake? Always.

So why go faux with risotto?

1.  In my humble cooking opinion, using orzo makes this recipe a whole lot less temperamental to cook. Traditional risotto takes a lot of hand holding—and constant stirring—to ensure success. Orzo is a bit more forgiving.

2. This orzo is organic AND whole wheat — healthy carbs rejoice!

3. I make it often because it cooks up in just 30 minutes and can be served as a main dish, or served as a side. It’s flexible like that. And one of my pantry staples.

Here’s why… 

Easy Lemon Orzo Faux Risotto is less fussy than the traditional version #recipe on foodiecrush.com

Easy Lemon Orzo Faux Risotto is less fussy than the traditional version #recipe on foodiecrush.com

Easy Lemon Orzo Faux Risotto is less fussy than the traditional version #recipe on foodiecrush.com

If you’re a risotto fan you already know that this beloved dish of Northern Italy tastes like a pasta but is actually a rice. A short little grain of rice that’s very starchy with glutens—usually arborio rice—that makes for a very creamy dish, sans the cream.

Orzo’s texture when cooked risotto-style is very similar to arborio—but it’s not trying to be a pasta imposter like arborio, it’s true blue pasta! And the whole wheat variety is a great way to introduce more whole grains into your (familiy’s!) diet. Sneaking in healthy foods, I love it!

This version is cooked the same style as traditional risotto, with the chicken or vegetable broth added in waves, allowing the broth and lemon juice to be absorbed into the pasta. The starch releases from the pasta as it cooks to create a creamy consistency that’s pumped up with melty parmesan cheese.

Easy Lemon Orzo Faux Risotto is less fussy than the traditional version #recipe on foodiecrush.com

About the recipe:

I used a 3-quart, 10-inch diameter saute pan for this recipe because just like all pasta, the orzo puffs as you add the broth. Use a larger skillet or dutch oven if you don’t have a high sided saute pan.

When cooking the onions, the addition of olive oil will make it less likely for the butter to burn. A drizzle or scant 1 teaspoon will do the trick. Watch the onions as they cook and turn down the heat if they begin to brown. You want soft, transparent onions not browned, which could make the dish bitter.

Convincing my family to eat whole grains and especially whole wheat pasta is not an easy task, but I must say, I’m making headway. Hey, I don’t want to eat cardboard either!  I love DeLallo’s whole wheat orzo pasta, and all of their pastas, because of their quality, and because their whole wheat pasta actually tastes good. Who woulda thunk?

I prefer chicken broth in this recipe because I think it pairs best with the lemony flavor, but feel free to try vegetable broth, and let me know if you like it. Add the broth in stages, replenishing as the broth is absorbed into the pasta. I used the suggested 32-ounces in this recipe, but it’s a good idea to have an extra smaller can of broth on hand if you need it.

I mentioned that using orzo makes this less of an on-the-job-can’t-leave-it’s-side recipe than using traditional risotto. However, that does not mean you can sneak off and watch an episode of The Voice (Team Gwen! Somebody’s gotta cheer the girl on…) and ignore it all together. You will want to stir it regularly so it doesn’t stick to the pan.

To reheat, simply stir in an additional 1/4 to 1/2 cup of additional broth into the risotto and warm it up on the stove or in the microwave.

Easy Lemon Orzo Faux Risotto is less fussy than the traditional version #recipe on foodiecrush.com

If you try this recipe, please let me know! Leave a comment below, or take a photo and tag it on Instagram or Twitter with #foodiecrush! 

Easy Lemon Orzo Faux Risotto
 
This faux risotto uses whole wheat orzo instead of the traditional arborio rice, making it a less tempermental version of an Italian classic.
Serves: serves 4 as a main dish, 8 as a side dish
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 cup diced onion, about 1 medium onion
  • 1 (16-ounce) package DeLallo organic whole wheat orzo pasta
  • 4-5 cups chicken or vegetable broth, 1 (32-ounce) box or can and 1 (15-ounce) can
  • Zest of 2 lemons, divided
  • Juice from 1 lemon or ¼ cup
  • ¾ teaspoon kosher salt or to taste
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper or to taste
  • ½ cup grated parmesan cheese
  • ¼ cup chopped Italian parsley
Instructions
  1. Melt the butter and olive oil in a 3-quart, 10-inch, high-sided saute pan or a 12-inch skillet. Add the onion and cook for 4-5 minutes, stirring often, until the onion becomes soft and transparent. If the onion begins to brown, reduce the heat to medium-low.
  2. Add the orzo to the skillet and mix into the onions. Add enough broth to cover the orzo, and gently stir, then bring to a low boil, and reduce to a simmer so that the pasta gently bubbles. Stir often, until the broth is absorbed or about 10 minutes. Add the lemon juice and half of the lemon zest to the risotto and continue adding the broth ½ to 1 cup at a time, stirring often, until the liquid is absorbed and the pasta is al dente, about 30 minutes.
  3. Remove from the heat, season with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper and stir in the parmesan cheese. Sprinkle with the Italian parsley and the remaining lemon zest.

Easy Lemon Orzo Faux Risotto is less fussy than the traditional version #recipe on foodiecrush.com

This post is sponsored by DeLallo Foods. As always, thank you for reading and supporting companies I partner with, which allows me to create more unique content and recipes for you. As always, all opinions are my own.  

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